OPINION

Longing for lightness of times past

It is somewhat painful admitting that I am nostalgic for the life we were all living, just 10 or 12 weeks ago.

By Jamila Rizvi

OPINION

It is somewhat painful admitting that I am nostalgic for the life we were all living, just 10 or 12 weeks ago.

By Jamila Rizvi

I woke up feeling nostalgic this morning. The evening before I’d come across this BBC article, ‘The last ‘normal’ photo on your phone’ and fell down a rabbit hole of longing. My husband and I sat on the couch with our phones, scrolling back only a few months to images that felt like historical relics of an era long past.

There are my son and I after swimming lessons, having a quick coffee at our local café, before rushing home to change for his ballet class. SNAP. There is our family at the AFLW, wrapped in scarves and beanies, eating sausage rolls and waving our flags. SNAP. My girlfriends and I on the street outside a fancy restaurant in the city, because we were too busy chatting to capture the moment during our meal. SNAP.

My husband and his mates sitting on the beach after a surf, with messy, salty hair and exhausted but satisfied expressions. SNAP. My son with all his mates from kinder, rolling around together in the sandpit, playing Power Rangers or Voltron or one of those. SNAP. And there I am on stage, interviewing a group of authors in a room of 200 eager Future Women members and their guests. SNAP.

It is somewhat painful admitting that I am nostalgic for the life we were all living, just 10 or 12 weeks ago. I’m not sure when, if ever, we get to go back to that life of football stadiums, busy restaurants, live theatre performances and hugging our friends. Nonetheless, I am happy to have the memories captured on this little device I carry with me everywhere. I am content to revisit them in my mind, for now.

In this week’s instalment of our Anonymous Was a Woman PodcastAstrid Edwards and I unpack the novels and non-fiction works that make us nostalgic. The writing that transports us back to another time or place. Whether that place is captured in the pages of the book itself, or simply the place we were in personally while reading them.

After covering some pretty heavy ground in the previous episodes, it was an absolute pleasure for both Astrid and I, to dip back into books we’d first read over a decade ago. Interviewing my childhood hero Melina Marchetta was an absolute highlight and I am sure those who read Looking for Alibrandi in high school will relish the listening experience.

So, if you have a spare half hour to fill this week, why not take a happy trip to the past and ignore the painful present for a while? Let us know what you think and continue the conversation in the Future Women community.

Take care of yourselves.

Jamila Rizvi