HerVote

Leaning In To Our Right To Vote, Even When It Feels Hopeless

In the lead up to our first HerVote event on Friday, editor-at-large Jamila Rizvi reminds us why we need to engage with the detail now more than ever.

By Jamila Rizvi

HerVote

In the lead up to our first HerVote event on Friday, editor-at-large Jamila Rizvi reminds us why we need to engage with the detail now more than ever.

By Jamila Rizvi

Most Australians will never actually meet one another, yet we possess a shared sense of being ‘Australian’. What being ‘Australian’ actually means may look rather different from say, Waleed Aly to Pauline Hanson. Nonetheless, the concept of being a nation ensures we’re invested – not only in our individual futures – but also that of people around us. Including those whom we have no personal connection with.

Back in the 1980s, Bennedict Anderson described this kind of nationalism as an ‘imagined community’. He argued that the invention of print media was central to maintaining fellowship amongst members of a society. By reading the news, citizens formed a shared knowledge base and better understood what was happening to the broader populous. Access to the same news, opinion and ideas built a sense of belonging within a nation. Alongside that grew an investment in the social welfare of others.

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#HerVote is our new campaign aiming to elevate women’s voices and inform women’s opinions. Join us on Friday April 5 for our first #HerVote event in partnership with Twitter featuring a number of prominent female political voices and upcoming candidates. 

You’ve hit the glass ceiling. And our paywall.

Help us smash it by becoming a Future Woman for as little as $4 a month.

Join the club

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