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Two Years On… This Is Why We Still March

Anne Summers, Bri Lee and NSW Domestic Violence CEO Moo Baulch want you to put down your phones and join them in Sydney for The Women's March this Sunday.

By Jamila Rizvi

The Latest

Anne Summers, Bri Lee and NSW Domestic Violence CEO Moo Baulch want you to put down your phones and join them in Sydney for The Women's March this Sunday.

By Jamila Rizvi

It’s been two years since Donald Trump stood in front of the Capitol Building to solemnly swear the oath that would make him 45th President of the United States. Despite the fear and trepidation shared by many at that time, I’m not sure anyone could have predicted the quite the wild ride American citizens – and indeed global citizens – have been on since. Our existence is now one of alternative facts, widespread distrust of government institutions, and unrepentant discriminatory efforts from the most powerful person in the world.

In amongst all the doom and gloom, however, positives have emerged since Trump’s election; these include a reenergised and refocused women’s movement. A movement that made itself seen and heard on the very first day of his presidency, with worldwide marches attracting millions of people. This weekend those marches will be replicated, as they were the previous year, including here in Australia. It begs the question whether two years on, these demonstrations against Trump’s accession to office are still relevant?

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