Arts

On The Basis Of Sex

Jamila Rizvi reviews the film documenting the life of Ruth Bader Ginsberg, now an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court. What emerges is not only her strength, but a partnership well beyond its era.

By Jamila Rizvi

Arts

Jamila Rizvi reviews the film documenting the life of Ruth Bader Ginsberg, now an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court. What emerges is not only her strength, but a partnership well beyond its era.

By Jamila Rizvi

The screen is filled with a parade of young white men in black suits. Full of confidence and optimism, they stride towards the heavy oak doors of America’s most prestigious university. After a time, the eye is drawn to someone different. A single woman in a dress, wearing stockings and heels. Her eyes are hopeful. While surrounded by people she is still alone. ‘10,000 Men of Harvard’ plays in the background.

It’s at this point in the film that I’m interrupted. I’m in a special media screening of On the Basis of Sex so that film reviewers and writers can see the movie early and report for the public. No credits play beforehand, there isn’t the usual popcorn and coke in people’s hands. Instead the cinema is slightly brighter than normal, allowing the attendees to take notes during the film. There is a sea of iPads and notebooks.

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